Our team of specialists and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. Or, for a more comprehensive search of our entire website, enter your term(s) in the search bar provided below.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

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ALLERGY IMMUNOTHERAPY HOURS: 

Allergy shots will be given at GREENBRIER ALLERGY AND AUDIOLOGY on the following dates at the listed times ONLY.  

AS OF 7/1/2017 WE WILL ONLY BE GIVING ALLERGY SHOTS ON THURSDAYS BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 8am-11:30am and 1pm-4pm  

You can come in any of the following Thursdays to receive your allergy injections.

July 13, 2017

July 20, 2017

July 27, 2017

NO ALLERGY INJECTIONS  AUGUST 3, 2017

Please Note  : These hours are subject to change DAILY.  Please remember during the winter months it may be necessary to close our allergy clinic due to staffing issues or other unexpected reasons.  Please also remember that Dr. Christopher White is a SPECIALISTS and one of the only ENT providers in the area.  He may be called out of the office during these hours causing our allergy clinic to be closed for the duration of their absence.  We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause our patients, but for the safety of THEM we do not administer allergy immunotherapy while Dr. White is not physically in the building.

Please visit our website www.greenbrierallergyandaudiology.net      weekly or call our office     (304) 520-4991

to find out if we are administering allergy shots the day you are able to have them.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

9am-12pm and 1pm-4pm  

Snoring is a noise produced during sleep that originates in the back of the throat or nose. Snoring occurs when the muscles in the back of the mouth, tongue and throat relax while sleeping, which narrows or blocks the airway. Breathing causes your uvula (soft palate) to vibrate and knock against the back of the throat, resulting in the snoring sound. Swollen or infected tonsils and adenoids, blocked nasal passages or a deviated septum can also narrow the airway and lead to snoring. Obesity, some medications and alcohol consumption before bedtime may contribute to snoring.

Snoring can also be a sign of a more serious problem, known as obstructive sleep apnea. With sleep apnea, the relaxed muscles at the back of the throat cause the throat to close, which stops breathing, typically from 20 seconds to up to three minutes. Most sleep apnea sufferers experience this cycle of snoring, apnea and awakening five or more times a night. Sleep apnea has a higher incidence among people age 40 and older, people with a family history of snoring and in postmenopausal women.

Because it disrupts the normal sleep pattern, sleep apnea makes you feel tired, slows your reaction time and can lead to confused thinking and memory loss. Other complications of sleep apnea can be high blood pressure, heart attacks, stroke, hypertension, anxiety and depression.

Sleep apnea is diagnosed through a physical examination with particular emphasis on weight, blood pressure and airway constriction in the nose, throat and lungs. In many cases, a sleep test will be recommended at a sleep laboratory. The sleep test monitors 16 different body functions while you sleep and can help identify the exact cause and severity of the sleep apnea.

Simple techniques for alleviating mild apnea are to sleep on your sides (not on your back) and avoid alcohol or sedatives before bedtime. In mild cases, treatment may consist of nasal decongestants, inhaled steroid preparations or oral mouth devices that force the jaw forward to prevent the tongue from falling back and constricting the throat. For more difficult cases, your doctor may prescribe a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP). This device straps onto your face and generates pressurized air, which helps keep your airway open during sleep. In severe cases, surgery may be called for to open the airway, including a tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy or deviated septum repair.

If you suffer from debilitating snoring or think you may have sleep apnea, please contact our office and schedule an appointment with one of our otolaryngologists.